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Call for papers - Student poster session

Deadline: Friday, Dec 21, 2018

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• Submission Deadline – Friday, December 21, 2018, 5pm ET
To submit a poster for consideration in the DistribuTECH student poster session - click on the link below and submit the necessary information: poster title, authors, abstract (max 200 words)

Space is limited for our poster display. Posters will be accepted on a first come, first serve basis.

Friday, December 28, 2018, 5pm ET – Students will be notified regarding their acceptance.

Monday, January 28, 2018, 5pm ET – A final copy of your poster must be submitted as a PDF document to Mary Lawrence, mary@irecusa.org. This PDF will be posted to the DistribuTECH website here

Student eligibility

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Poster topics must fit into one of the categories below:

• Markets (Business Side)
• Cyber Security
• Microgrids
• Distributed Automation and Distribution Modeling
• Power System Engineering
• Smart Inverters & Power Electronics
• Renewables Generation and Integration
• DER Control
• Energy Storage
• Climate/Environmental (Climate Action Plan)
• Smart Cities (Smart Homes, Electric Vehicles, etc.)

Students must attend the DistribuTECH Conference for at least one day to display a poster.
Undergraduate and Graduate students may submit posters.
Submissions may come from GEARED and non-GEARED universities.

Poster Session Times
11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, 2/5/2019; 1:00pm-2:00pm Wednesday, 2/6/2019

Poster session dates

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Submission Deadline – Friday, December 21, 2018, 5pm ET 
To submit a poster for consideration in the DistribuTECH student poster session - click on the link below and submit the necessary information: poster title, authors, abstract (max 200 words)

Space is limited for our poster display. Posters will be accepted on a first come, first serve basis.

Friday, December 28, 2018, 5pm ET 
Students will be notified regarding their acceptance.

Monday, January 28, 2018, 5pm ET
A final copy of your poster must be submitted as a PDF document to Mary Lawrence, mary@irecusa.org. This PDF will be posted to the DistribuTECH website here

Poster session logistics

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• Posters must be one printed sheet, roughly 34" by 48" (portrait or landscape orientation is permitted).
• Printed collections of slides will not be allowed.
• Mounting Boards and push pins will be provided for display.
• Students must print their own poster and are responsible for getting the poster to the conference.
• Student posters must be available for display from 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, February 5 until 12:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 7.
• If student travel plans do not allow the poster to arrive by 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, February 5, students will be expected to ship their poster. Shipping information will be shared closer to the event.
• Posters can be picked up between 12:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. on Thursday. Any posters not picked up by 2:00pm will be discarded.
• Students will be provided with an envelope where conference attendees can leave businesses cards.

Poster content & design guidelines

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GEARED Universities only: Posters must include the GEARED Program logo somewhere on the poster. A jpeg version of the logo will be provided to students with their confirmation notice.

Identify your poster near the top of the panel with the title of your presentation and all authors’ names and school affiliations. The title should be composed of CAPITAL letters at least 1" high. In general, poster layout and content is up to the student, however, please read through the design elements below and keep these things in mind.

• Remember, this is a VISUAL presentation - try to explain your ideas in a visually appealing way. The sequence of information on the poster should be logical and clear. An attendee who just walks by and reads your poster should have a clear idea of your presentation and the major points.

Simplicity: Keep your poster simple and provide a clear "take-home" message. Limit your presentation to essential data and include information to stimulate discussion; you can provide details in discussions. Most viewers will scan the display for its prominent features.

Think about your target audience. Although most of the participants will likely be technical folks, there will also be many non-technical attendees. Technical or non-technical, it is likely that most people will have less knowledge about your subject than you do. Keep it simple, but informative.

• The poster should typically include the following:
- Introduction (background, statement of hypothesis, purpose/objectives)
- Methods (experimental design, techniques)
- Results (data summary, findings)
- Conclusions (interpretations, implications)
- Summary of results/findings.

• Bullets work well to summarize key points or contributions of the study.
• Spell out acronyms in their entirety the first time used, followed by the acronym in parenthesis.
Order: Consider the flow of your poster - generally from left to right and top to bottom. Organize the material to tell a logical, coherent story.
Color: Aesthetics are an important part of preparing a poster that will attract attention. The use of color will enhance poster readability (i.e., for contrast and to highlight important points) and attractiveness. Use muted colors that blend well, and do not overpower text or graphics. Use primary colors, and do not use shocking colors like pink or yellow.
Graphics & Pictures: Important. Use figures (graphs, charts and illustrations with captions) as much as possible, making sure that they are legible. Pictures and PDF images need to be at least 300 DPI.?
Fonts: The written text should be sufficiently large to allow easy reading from a distance of approximately five feet. Use large fonts for the title and sub-headers - at least 72-point font for the title, 36-point font for the sub-headers, and 18-point font for the text. Use simple fonts such as Times New Roman or Helvetica.  Use only one type of font to avoid an unprofessional look. Avoid using too many style changes such as shadow, bold, italics, and underscoring.
Text: Use more white space around your work as light and empty space is more attractive to the eye. Avoid large, continuous blocks of text; use small blocks instead. Make sure the small blocks of text can stand-alone. It should still make sense if someone comes up to your poster and reads only a small portion of it. Use the minimum amount of text possible. Consider using right-justified text. Justified text might look nicer from a distance, but is more difficult to read. Remember that people will be standing and reading the text on the spot.